LGBTQ in Obion County – Joey

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Joey Glover, 35, Gay

What is it like for you to live in a rural community? Not easy because when I came out in 1998 my family and I were ridiculed over me. And I was threatened and beat up to point we had to move into the country. I could go on for days about what all people have done to me and every so often still do. As time has passed and the ages progressed things have gotten easier

What do you love best about the area? I’ve lived in Chicago, Nashville, south Bend, Indiana and several other big cities, but my roots are here and I just love my home. All people here aren’t bigots. And I love the country  as my partner of 9 years Amos loves also……….

What would you like for local residents to know about the LGBTQ community? All I can say what I want people to know is that we are people just like them and their kids. We aren’t child molesters and bad people, but people who just want to be treated normal and with respect like everyone else is. We are normal. We didn’t choose to be Gay. I would have never picked the hardest lifestyle to live. I’ve known  from the time of a little child even though I confused people because I lived a lie to appease my parents and classmates and friends til I couldn’t do anymore. Coming out to my family was the best thing I ever did even though I know several who were abandoned by family because of it. When people ask me how did I know I was Gay, I tell them how did you know you liked a guy or a girl. They say I just do. That’s the way it is. Well, that’s same answer I have ……..

What advice would you give to those in the area who may feel alone? You are never alone. There are people out here who love and care. Even at your darkest points you just have to trust in yourself and live your authentic self no matter what. Life is too short and we really are in the last days of man and you need to live life to the fullest. Material things and stature doesn’t matter in this fictitious world we live in. You, be you and as long as you are happy, sorry for the language “FUCK THEM”

Photo/Essay project highlighting the LGBTQ and Ally Community in Obion County (a rural area in TN). Some participants still live in the area, while others have moved away after growing up there.

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Callye Norsworthy, age 35, Ally

    I was brought up as a southern Baptist Christian. I was taught that homosexuality is not only a choice…but a sin. For many years of my early life, I believed it. As I got older, I began questioning this…and eventually my faith. This attitude toward same sex love and relationships seemed so contradictory to the love of Jesus.

   The catalyst for my disengaging completely from this line of belief was when my best friend, a proud gay man who loves Jesus, was asked to leave our church. He wasn’t welcome. I looked around at men who were knowingly having affairs (among other things) who refused to worship with my friend simply because he is gay. For me, it was the final straw.

   From that point on, I took it upon myself to educate myself…to read, watch documentaries, engage, hear and listen to my LGBTQ friends and family. I am a straight, white woman. I recognize the privilege that comes with that. I have spent much of the last two years of my life learning and searching. Trying to find ways that I can help my fellow humans. To make this world a better place.

  I have three children. Raising them as a single mother is a difficult task. Add to that the fact that I am raising them in the close-minded, often racist, bigoted, and homophobic rural south. I can’t move. I can’t take them to a bigger city where there is more diversity…more culture. But what I can do is make HERE better. Or try anyway. I look at my children and I wonder….what if one or more or all of them are gay? So how could I NOT work to make this world a better, more loving and accepting place for them?? Any mother should. And if your mother won’t….this mother will.

Photo/Essay project highlighting the LGBTQ and Ally Community in Obion County (a rural area in TN). Some participants still live in the area, while others moved away after growing up there.

LGBTQ in Obion County – Callye

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Jillian and Tasha Bowman with Riley and Justice Bell.

My name is Tasha Bowman. I’m 37 years old. This is our family on our wedding day! 2/12/16. My children are very supportive of our relationship. Jillian has been “out” since she was 13 and I came out in 2013. My children have had to face the judgment of some adults and friends. I have had to face judgement by several of my church members. Yes, I’m a Christian. I’m a Christian without a church home because of judgement. My family and friends have all stood by my side. I’m very proud of them for that. I want people to know that regardless of who I love, I am the same person. Actually, I may be more compassionate than I was before. That’s not only because of my situation but because of my amazing wife with her huge heart and my very compassionate children.

Photo/Essay project highlighting the LGBTQ and Ally Community in Obion County (a rural area in TN). Some participants still live in the area, while others have moved away after growing up there.

LGBTQ in Obion County – Tasha

LGBTQ in Obion County – Craig

Craig R. Lewis, 35, Gay

(Pictured with husband, David and children, Knox & Kruz)

Where do you live now? Gardner, Kansas

What was it like for you to live in a rural community? I really enjoyed living in the country, five miles outside of Hornbeak, Tennessee. I came from a very large family that fulfilled me with love, guidance, and most of all God’s word. Challenges started for me at the age of 6 that something was different about me.

What do you love best about the area? I am country… I am a man and I still at the age of 35 now like to wake up and go take a piss outside with no worry of getting a ticket for indecency exposure….lol

What would you like for local residents to know about the LGBTQ community? This is a powerful questions…. kinda like the layers of an onion…. the more you pull the layers of skin away the more I cry… ummm but I guess the adult answer would be, being apart of this organization save me because more than I care to say wanted to end the battle that I had inside of me.

People of the community that I do love very much needs to understand that God’s love is ALWAYS UNCONDITIONAL. So unless you have walked in my shoes, have been disowned by your family, or any negatively what so ever about who you are and how you live your life to be happy…. my suggestion is to just shut the fuck up…. because today I have the family I dreamed of for a very long time. David and I are great people and have 2 beautiful children that will never have to go through what I had to… my love for everyone is unconditional. .. just like my Heavenly Father…

What advice would you give to those in the area who may feel alone? We are all made in the image of God. You have a purpose in this life, you may not see it at the moment but everyone does. Be patient and lesson to that still voice inside of you for leadership and guidance. I’m not saying it going to be easy…. but my friend you are not alone… and you have purpose.

Never give up on your dreams… because God is alive and well and knows all things with each of us…. even the numbers of hairs on your head…

Hold your head high! Because you too are a blank canvass that needs colorful stokes to paint your future… it is there for you as long as you stay true to yourself.

Photo/Essay project highlighting the LGBTQ and Ally Community in Obion County (a rural area in TN). Some participants still live in the area, while others have moved away after growing up there.

LGBTQ in Obion County – Kate

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Kate Surr, 28, Bisexual

What was it like for you to live in a rural community? Some days it’s difficult. The best thing you can do is surround yourself with people who love you as you are. It feels as though there is one in a hundred people who know and understand you. It’s hard to find those people but they are out there. Sometimes it takes you being outwardly honest for other people to be honest with you. As I’ve gotten older I’ve cared less about what other people think in this small rural town. (What is it about these small towns that give individuals the feeling of entitlement to share their opinions as the law 😜)

What do you love best about the area? The people who are here and have open hearts and minds are the best in my opinion. Think about it, you get the southern hospitality mixed with all the love in the world with zero judgment and full acceptance. You couldn’t have better friends in your life.

What would you like for local residents to know about the LGBTQ community? We are people. Just like you. The same children you are fight for against abortion are the same children and adults that you are badgering now. (And I only give that example because, commonly, if you are against abortion then you are generally against LGBTQ.) You love these children unconditionally? Then accept us for who we are no matter who we turn out to be. We can’t be changed. We’ve been this way our whole lives. Nothing you can do will change that. However, loving us all, even though we are different from you, can make the world more beautiful place. It’s already difficult enough, why make it even harder.

What advice would you give to those in the area who may feel alone?  Be true to yourself. You don’t have to tell anyone until you’re ready. I promise that as you get older it will get easier. There are so so so many people out there just like you and me. If you have access to the internet you can find those people in a matter of minutes. Social media is a great place to find groups and events supporting us. Also, updates on lawmakers fighting for our basic rights as human beings. (If your interested in what’s going on the country… its good to know who’s fighting for you, even though they don’t know you).

Photo/Essay project highlighting the LGBTQ and Ally Community in Obion County (a rural area in TN). Some participants still live in the area, while others have moved away after growing up there.

LGBTQ in Obion County – Jared

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Jared Hamlin, 35, Gay

What is it like for you to live in a rural community? Some days I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. Other days I want to get out of here as fast as I can. It’s hard to be different here, but I can take it. I stay so someone is here that can take it. In my own way I do it to shield the ones that can’t.

What do you love best about the area? I actually love so much about it here. The history, my family, my friends, and the fact that in about 2 hours I can be in one of many larger cities.

 What would you like for local residents to know about the LGBTQ community? We are the same as the rest of the community. We work. We live. We love. We really aren’t different from the rest of the world. And for the record I loathe the fact that we have to have a label and can’t exist.

What advice would you give to those in the area who may feel alone? First off, you aren’t alone. We are here to be with you through whatever you are going through. Take a deep breath and hold on. It gets better. It takes time, but it does happen. We have to deal with the negative parts of life so we can appreciate the positive ones when they happen.

Photo/Essay project highlighting the LGBTQ and Ally Community in Obion County (a rural area in TN). Some participants still live in the area, while others have moved away after growing up there.